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  • Seoul to open the restoration site of Dilkusha to the public

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    • Dilkusha, the house of Albert Taylor who first reported the March First Independence Movement to the world, is set to open in 2020 as a museum for independence movement
    • Prior to its official opening, its restoration site to be opened for the first time on upcoming March 1 to mark the 100th anniversary of the March First Movement
    • 40 family applicants with up to four family members including children from elementary to high school to participate in the exploration program on the first-come-first-served basis
    • The restoration site is open to all citizens and visitors from 2pm to 4:20pm; however the inside of the house is not opened for a safety reason.

    SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA, February 19, 2019 — Located in Haengchon-dong, Jongno-gu, central Seoul, Dilkusha (the Hindi word for “Heart’s Delight”), with a unique exterior and arched windows on red bricks next to a gingko tree was the house of Albert Taylor, an American who first reported the March First Independence Movement to the world.

    It would be a good opportunity to recall the meaning of the March First Independence Movement, the fight against Japanese colonial rule, by visiting the house of a foreign independence fighter. It would be also meaningful to see its modern architectural style during the Japanese occupation period.

    Since November 2018 after the squatter was relocated in July 2018, the Seoul Metropolitan Government has been restoring Dilkusha to transform it as a museum that highlights foreigners who helped Korea’s independence.

    Prior to its official opening in 2020, the city government will open the restoration site of the house to the public on upcoming March 1 for the first time as part of the commemorative event for the 100th anniversary of the March First Independence Movement. The restoration site will be open to all visitors, however the inside of the house is not opened for a safety reason.

    Meanwhile, citizens are allowed to join a program to explore independence movement sites including Dilkusha, making it a special opportunity to learn about the history of the house and Albert Taylor as well as its ongoing restoration work. The program will take about one and a half hours (2pm to 3:30pm) to visit four places (Dilkusha, Deoksugung Palace, Jeongdong, and Gyeonggyojang). During the program, a cultural heritage commentator will provide an insightful explanation about the history of Korea including that of the Korean Empire and the Japanese colonial period.

    The exploration program is open to families with up to four family members including children from elementary to high school on the first-come-first-served basis. Those interested may apply at http://yeyak.seoul.go.kr from 10am on February 20.