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  • Joseon-era Archaeological Site in front of Gwanghwamun Square Disclosed to the Public

  • Culture & Tourism news SMG 1654
    A large number of relics from the Joseon dynasty have been excavated during construction work at Gwanghwamun Square.

    In particular, locations of major administrative offices of the Joseon dynasty that had been assumed to exist through historical records as well as the foundations of buildings were confirmed for the first time through actual site evidence.

    The Seoul Metropolitan Government (SMG) is now publicly disclosing various artifacts and features that have been newly discovered through archaeological excavations of cultural heritage conducted at Gwanghwamun Square since January 2019.

    The SMG will open the archaeological site for viewing both in person and online in consideration of the on-going pandemic. The SMG will also collect citizens’ feedback to reflect the public’s opinions in the conservation of the remains.

    Various traces were found in about 40% (4,000 m2) of the 10,100 m2 of the total investigated area, including the ruins of government offices in the fifteenth and nineteenth centuries as well as the sites of private houses, fences, wells, waterways and gates.

    The offline disclosure of the excavated remains of Gwanghwamun Square will be held for nine days from Fri, May 21 to Sat, May 29, twice a day (a total of 18 times).

    Citizens can visit the Gwanghwamun Square website (https://gwanghwamun.seoul.go.kr) and apply for a viewing session (up to 12 per session; total of 200 people) on a first-come, first-served basis. You can apply in advance from Tue, May 11 to Wed, May 19 by downloading the application form from the Gwanghwamun Square website and submitting it via email.

    A video will be uploaded on various channels, including the SMG website. The video will consist of the process of excavating cultural properties at Gwanghwamun Square, sites of the Joseon dynasty seen through documents, sights of the archaeological site identified as a result of excavation, and expert commentary.

    Photo 1: Map of buried cultural heritage survey sites
    Photo 1: Map of buried cultural heritage survey sites
    Photo 2: View of Samgunbu site (① on map) (S→N)
    Photo 2: View of Samgunbu site (① on map) (S→N)
    Photo 3: View of Samgunbu (Three Armies Command) site (① on map) (NE→SW)
    Photo 3: View of Samgunbu (Three Armies Command) site (① on map) (NE→SW)
    Photo 4: View of drainage stone alignment (est. Yukjo-geori; Street of Six Ministries) (S→N)
    Photo 4: View of drainage stone alignment (est. Yukjo-geori; Street of Six Ministries) (S→N)
    Photo 5: Detailed view of drainage stone alignment (est. Yukjo-geori; Street of Six Ministries)
    Photo 5: Detailed view of drainage stone alignment (est. Yukjo-geori; Street of Six Ministries)
    Photo 6: Western view of Hyeongjo (Ministry of Justice) site (④ on map) (S→N)
    Photo 6: Western view of Hyeongjo (Ministry of Justice) site (④ on map) (S→N)
    Photo 7: Eastern view of Hyeongjo (Ministry of Justice) site’s features (④ on map) (S→N)
    Photo 7: Eastern view of Hyeongjo (Ministry of Justice) site’s features (④ on map) (S→N)
    Photo 8: Western view of Hyeongjo (Ministry of Justice) site’s features (④ on map) (S→N)
    Photo 8: Western view of Hyeongjo (Ministry of Justice) site’s features (④ on map) (S→N)
    Photo 9: View of Yukjo-geori (Street of Six Ministries) site (⑥ on map) (N→S)
    Photo 9: View of Yukjo-geori (Street of Six Ministries) site (⑥ on map) (N→S)
    Photo 10: Central view of Yukjo-geori (Street of Six Ministries) site (⑥ on map) (E→W)
    Photo 10: Central view of Yukjo-geori (Street of Six Ministries) site (⑥ on map) (E→W)