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  • What is the Average Monthly Wage for Seoul’s Social Service Workers?

    SMG 1470
  • The average monthly wage for social service workers in Seoul was found to be KRW 2.06 million, which is KRW 1.14 million less than the average monthly wage of Seoul citizens—about KRW 3.2 million.

    Wages for social service workers were generally higher when the ratio of regular to irregular workers was higher and lower when the ratio was lower.

    Note: Social service refers to a system in which federal and regional governments as well as the private sector guarantee all citizens a dignified standard of living in terms of welfare, health and medical services, education, employment, housing, culture, and environment and work toward improving the quality of life for citizens by providing support for counseling, rehabilitation, care, provision of information, use of related facilities, capacity development, and social participation (Framework Act on Social Security).

    Seoul’s social service workers earned an average of KRW 2.06 million per month, or about KRW 13,000 per hour

    - The average monthly wage for social service workers was KRW 1.14 million less than the average monthly wage for workers in Seoul in 2014, which was KRW 3.2 million.

    - The hourly wage for social service workers in Seoul was KRW 13,000, which is less than KRW 18,000, the average hourly wage for workers in Seoul.

    - The average monthly wages for all types of social service positions in Seoul were found to be lower than the average monthly wage for workers in Seoul—about KRW 3.2 million.

    Wages for social service workers were generally higher when the ratio of regular to irregular workers was higher and lower when the ratio was lower.

    - The average monthly wage was the lowest for “lecturers for programs at social service organizations and child welfare teachers,” at KRW 1.33 million, followed by “nursing assistants” at KRW 1.58 million, and “administrative staff” at KRW 1.6 million

    - Among “lecturers for programs at social service organizations and child welfare teachers,” the percentage of temporary and hourly workers is higher due to the nature of the work at children’s group homes and regional children’s centers.

    (Chart 1) Average Monthly Wage and Work Hours for All Workers and Social Service Workers in Seoul (Units: Hours, KRW 10,000)

      Average Work Hours per Week Average Monthly Wage Hourly Wage
    Workers in Seoul 44.7 320.0 1.8
    Social Service Workers in Seoul 40.4 206.4 1.3

    Note: The average monthly wage for all workers in Seoul is the sum of regular and overtime pay (excluding bonuses and extra pay).
    Sources: 2014 Occupational Labor Force Survey at Establishments by Region (Ministry of Employment and Labor)
    Survey of Employment Conditions to Improve the Treatment of Social Service Workers in Seoul in 2014 (Yoon Min-Suk, Associate Research Fellow, The Seoul Institute)

    (Chart 2) Current Status of Social Service Occupations in Seoul (Units: KRW 10,000, %)

      Average Monthly Wage Hourly Wage Percentage of Regular Workers Percentage of Temporary Workers
    CEO 283.3 1.6 97.6 2.4
    Intermediate Manager 279.0 1.7 97.6 2.4
    Nurse 242.0 1.4 95 5
    Rehabilitation Worker 220.1 1.4 86.6 13.4
    Medical Assistant 202.3 1.1 80.3 19.7
    Counselor 195.5 1.2 76.9 23.1
    Social Worker 191.8 1.1 73.4 26.6
    Administrative Staff 159.6 1.1 61.8 38.2
    Nursing Assistant 157.6 1.0 56.8 43.2
    Lecturer for Programs at Social Service Organizations

    /
    Child Welfare Teacher
    132.5 1.0 35.1 64.9

    Note: Social service refers to a system in which federal and regional governments as well as the private sector guarantee all citizens a dignified standard of living in terms of welfare, health and medical services, education, employment, housing, culture, and environment and work toward improving the quality of life for citizens by providing support for counseling, rehabilitation, care, provision of information, use of related facilities, capacity development, and social participation (Framework Act on Social Security).

    Source: Survey of Employment Conditions to Improve the Treatment of Social Service Workers in Seoul in 2014 (Yoon Min-Suk, Associate Research Fellow, The Seoul Institute)

    ※ We have revised the term “teacher/daycare teacher” in this issue of the Infographics, uploaded on February 23, 2015, to prevent any misunderstanding. In previous issues, the term “teacher/daycare teacher” was used in reference to “workers who organize events at social service organizations or work at children’s group homes.” However, as these terms could be misinterpreted as referring to regular teachers and daycare teachers, “teacher” and “daycare teacher” have been changed to “lecturer for programs at social service organizations” and “child welfare teacher.”

    Source: The Seoul Institute (http://www.si.re.kr/node/51441)

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